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Kawasaki

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Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 5:16 pm

Kawasaki EL125 Eliminator

This low, light and easy-to-ride Kawasaki gets the cruiser look with tank-top instruments mounted in a chrome housing and foot-forward controls for a laid-back riding style.
Easy handling, learner legal and with an ultra-low seat height of just 680mm, the Kawasaki Eliminator 125 is a good choice for a first bike. The sweet changing five-speed gearbox means that you can make the best of the 12.5bhp available at 8000rpm.
This is a learner bike with a decent seat - there's plenty of room for a passenger for when you pass your test. And with its miserly fuel consumption, it's as cheap to run as it is easy to operate.
Service intervals are every 8000 and they should be amongst the lowest charges on any motorcycle. This is a lightweight motorcycle in the truest sense - it weighs in at just 135kg. But the simple four-stroke single could do with a bit more stonk.
It's up against the Yamaha Drag Star XVS125 in the learner cruiser class, and that is a pretty impressive package with 12.8bhp at 10,000rpm and much nicer lines.
A new 2003 Drag Star costs 3324 on the road, compared to 2935 for the Kawasaki. If you can afford the extra 389 we'd recommend you go for the Yamaha. It will hold its price better as well.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:10 pm

Kawasaki ER-5

The UK's top-selling 500 is a cheap bike, which means that you must be choosy when buying one of these120mph twins.
Look hard at Honda's CB500 and the Suzuki GS500, the Kawaski's direct competitors, too. While the ER-5 chassis is basic, with twin shocks and disc/drum brakes, the parallel twin engine isn't. You get liquid cooling, six gears, two camshafts, vibration-smoothing balancers and four valves per cylinder. Which is nice.
There's less power (50PS) than the similar GPZ500S, but reduced compression and increased flywheel weight make the engine more tractable at lower rpm. However, do not buy an ER-5 - or any other 500cc parallel twin - unless you get off on changing gear a lot. Do buy if you're vertically challenged, as the 17in wheels make the twin low, and it's also pleasantly light at 174kg dry.Previous ER-5 owners will include older novices, dispatch riders and riding schools. Engine bars can be the giveaway, especially if they've been scraped. Leave those bikes alone. Aim to buy from the sizeable number of older riders for whom a smooth parallel twin was their replacement for a long-dead British Vibrator.

You'll be able to spot a good honest bike a mile off as the ER-5's finish goes off badly if it's neglected. Engine noise, oil dribbles or smoking also mean that you should make an excuse and leave. Fancy the protection of a screen? Think CB500S, GPZ500S or fit one. There really are lots of ER-5s to choose from, so be picky.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:11 pm

Kawasaki GPZ500S

Genuine sports bike style doesn't come much cheaper than this. Like Kawasaki's big fours the 500 twin has two camshafts, eight valves and six speeds, but the parallel twin engine is only 380mm across and its seat is just 760mm from the ground.
The price is right because the GPZ500S comes with a steel box-section frame and suspension that's so basic all you get are spring preload collars on the retro-style twin shocks. A top half fairing and bellypan cowling add style and practical wind-cheating to just over 120mph. Most riders agree that the CB500S doesn't come close to the Kawasaki, but check the Honda twin out to see if you agree.
A gear-driven balancer running at crankshaft speed removes most but not all of a parallel twin's vibration at low revs, giving the GPZ a sophisticated feel that's never bland. Light and low, the twin's steering is quick but not twitchy. Good handling encourages quick cornering and the disc brakes are storming stoppers.
Avoid high-mileage bikes that may have been dispatched, homing in on the well-maintained mounts of older riders attracted by the 500's slim, low, light looks and feel. Engines run very quietly unless there's a problem and are smoke-free unless they've been over-revved.
The Kawasaki is cheap to run and service, and there are plenty to choose from with many buyers opting for new rather than used. This is your opportunity to drive the price right down with a silly offer that might just be accepted.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:13 pm

Kawasaki VN1500

Kawasaki has been making massive cruisers since way back in 1988 when the first VN1500 rumbled out of showrooms. And they got the design sorted pretty much from the start.
The Mean Streak was introduced for 2002 as a leaner, meaner version of the VN1500 Classic Tourer. Both bikes use the liquid cooled, eight-valve, single overhead camshaft 1470cc V-twin engine. Like all bikes in the VN1500 range since 2001, the Mean Streak has dumped the carburettor and replaced it with fuel injectors for cleaner emissions and better economy.
The Mean Streak's engine has been tweaked with massive 40mm throttle bodies for a satisfying boost in performance. Valve sizes have been increased too and the valve timing gets more overlap, transforming the nature of the machine and encouraging riders to rev the motor freely.
But in spite of all this high tech wizardry, the Mean Streak pumps out a measly 71bpp, which is only adequate for hauling 289kg of metal and plastic around. Fortunately the big VN delivers 84ft-lb of torque from 3000rpm - that's better than Harley's Electra Glide Ultra Classic and even more than the spanking new V-Rod.
The Mean Streak dumps the valanced mudguards of the Classic Tourer for skinny blades, and the suspension has been upgraded with 43mm inverted forks for first-rate compression and rebound damping, excellent steering feedback and surefooted handling for a "sportier" ride. The swingarm has air adjustable twin shocks. Ground clearance is increased over the tourer as well.
The brakes are impressive for a cruiser - there's a pair of 320mm discs with six-piston calipers up front and a single 300mm disc with twin-piston caliper at the rear. Wheelbase is 1705mm so don't expect to be doing U-turns. But footing around shouldn't be a problem - seat height is a lowly 700mm
Although the Mean Streak appears to sport twin straight-thru pipes, the configuration is actually 2-1-2. Separate electronic speedometer and tachometer units are mounted on the top triple-clamp. It all adds up to the best VN1500 yet.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:16 pm

Kawasaki VN800

Launched way back in 1995 as a new take on an old cruiser, the VN800 Classic is based on the old VN800. The Classic gets a lower seat, fatter tyres and valanced mudguards - though the mudguards are nothing like as eye-catching as the ones on its Drifter sibling.
The 16-inch spoked wheels and fat tyres contribute to the nostalgic look. And these wheels should keep looking good - a special plastic coating is applied to the spokes for improved corrosion resistance.
Lashings of chrome and polished alloy and the large, comfortable seat completes the long distance cruiser image.
The impressive liquid-cooled 805cc engine delivers the proven performance and reliability for which Kawasaki V-Twins are famous. The eight-valve, single overhead-cam powerplant pumps out plenty of low-down torque for city cruising or highway touring.
Thanks to the oversquare 88.0 x 66.2mm bore and stroke there is a punchy response and plenty of high-rpm power when needed. The Keihin pumper carburettor ensures sharp throttle response across the rev range. Power output is a respectable 55bhp at 7000rpm.
Low-maintenance features like automatic cam chain tensioners and electronic ignition keep the VN800 out of the shop and on the road.
The excellent handling qualities derived from its hidden, bottom-link Uni-Trak rear suspension and sturdy 41mm front forks makes the Classic an extremely stable motorcycle for cruising and touring, but the raked out fork makes the handlebars turn in too easily at low speed. Most cruisers do the same - even Harleys.
There is an extensive range of Genuine Kawasaki accessories to make your Classic more individual.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:17 pm

Kawasaki W650

Looking more like a classic Bonneville than Hinkley Triumph's offering, Kawasaki's retro W650 was designed to clean up in the Japanese market where the craze for Sixties style is still running strong.
But when pictures of the W650 trickled out of Japan there was a clamour from classic bike fans to have the bike imported to the UK. It soon developed a cult following with W650 clubs springing up around the world.
But when the bike was launched here in 1999 Kawasaki was keen to point out that they built the 676cc parallel twin as a homage to their own 1966 W1, a four-speed 650 with a claimed 50bhp that was a half decent copy of a BSA A10.
But where those old nails used pushrod engines, the W650 has a bevel drive to the single overhead camshaft - it runs in the chrome tube on the right side of the engine.
The crankshaft is a 360-degree design which allows the pistons to rise and fall together, with one cylinder on the compression stroke and the other on the exhaust stroke. There is a balance shaft to help eliminate vibration.
Modern touches include four valves per cylinder and constant velocity carbs. Kawasaki's integrated ignition control uses a throttle position sensor to vary ignition timing according to throttle position and engine rpm for crisp throttle response and better fuel efficiency.
The motor is really sweet, with 46bhp at 6900rpm. There's plenty of grunt to get you to 70 quickly and without fuss. Even the exhausts sound good.
The motor is rubber mounted in a classic (read 1960s) steel tube cradle frame with a square tube backbone. As you'd expect with a retro, the W650 has spoked wheels, with a 19in tyre on the front and an 18in on the rear. There is a drum brake at the back, but the single disc up front will be welcomed by classic bike fans.
Oh, and although there is a kickstart if you really want to play classic biker you get electric starting as well. There's modern for you.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:18 pm

Kawasaki Z1000

Mount a fuel injected Ninja ZX-9R-based engine in a lightweight chassis, fit Ninja running gear, and wrap it in new plastic and what do you get? Say hello to the Z1000.
Kawasaki added a sharp edge to the retro look with the new Z1000, using solid colours and fighter plane angles to the plastics.
The engine is the bullet-proof ZX-9R motor, bored out to 953cc and fuel injected with two throttle valves per injector for smoother power delivery. Big K tuned the liquid-cooled, 16-valve, in-line four to give masses of mid-range stomp, at the expense of top end - just what you want on a naked bike.
An inverted front fork with 41mm tubes makes the Thou look good and handle better, thanks to preload and rebound adjustments. Kawasaki's own Uni-Track rear suspension features a nitrogen gas-charged shock with piggyback reservoir, stepless spring preload and rebound damping adjustment.
An aluminium swingarm and wheels pinched from the ZX-9R mean the Z1000 should hold the road pretty well.
With semi-floating 300mm discs and lightweight four-pot calipers up front, and a 220mm single-piston caliper at the rear, you should be able to pin down the 198kg Z1000 pretty quickly.
Streetbikes need the muscle look if they are going to hack it, so Kawasaki hid the fact that the frame is an old style steel cradle made from large diameter, thin walled tubing. They've fixed plastic covers to the lower part of the engine to make it look like it's a beam frame.
We'll let them off seeing as how they've given the Zed Thou four gorgeous, golden cigar-tube exhaust cans and a digital speedometer inside an LCD rev meter. You can choose black or green paint jobs, but we'll have one in orange.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:20 pm

Kawasaki Z750

It had to happen. Following the stunning success of the Z1000, Kawasaki just had to bring out the Z750, a middleweight naked sports bike that will slash insurance premiums but still deliver that adrenalin rush whenever you wind open the twistgrip.
It may not be as sexy as the Z1000, but this bike has a personality all its own thanks to a combination of responsive power and lightweight handling. Class-leading engine performance comes from a 748cc liquid-cooled in-line four with electronic fuel injection. The cylinder head features re-shaped intake and exhaust ports, a modified combustion chamber and adjusted valve angle to suit the reduced bore size.
Based on the Z1000 engine, the powerplant delivers creamy torque over a broad rev range so that you can make the best of the six gears. The 34 mm throttle bodies with dual throttle valves and fine-atomising injectors give instant cold starting, smooth throttle response, excellent fuel economy and low exhaust emissions. A large, Z1000 radiator eliminates the need for an oil cooler.
Streetbikes need the muscle look if they are going to hack it. So Kawasaki have hidden the fact that the frame is an old style steel cradle by fixing plastic covers to the lower part of the engine. This makes it look like a beam frame, the same trick used on the Z1000. The stiff, box-section swingarm helps to reduce chassis flex and contributes to the bike's excellent road-holding qualities while the right way up 41mm fork delivers a supple ride and excellent steering feedback.
The rear gas shock features four-way rebound damping and seven-way preload adjustment for a smooth ride and excellent road holding qualities.
Simple twin-pot callipers squeeze the speed out of the twin 300mm front discs. A single pot caliper and 220mm disc steadies the back end.
The wheels have six "H" cross-section spokes, a design pinched from the Ninja ZX-10R. Unlike the big Zed Thou, the 750 gets an oval end can at the end of its stainless pipework instead of natty double twin cans. The header pipes of the four-into-one system joins pipes one and four, and two and three to give smooth throttle response at all rpm.
Seat height is 815mm, but the narrow saddle and slim tank means that getting your feet on the deck isn't such a stretch for short riders. The compact bikini cowl is standard, and there is an optional single-seat cover if you want to make the Z750 look a bit hard.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:21 pm

Kawasaki ZR-7

Kawasaki's sturdy and dependable 738cc ZR-7 may not be packed with cutting edge technology, but we think the softly tuned motor makes it a perfect first big bike. And a lot of people must agree with us, because this is one popular motorcycle.
To keep the ZR-7 at the top end of the sales charts, Kawasaki sharpened up the venerable 750 with new bodywork for 2001.
But the 738cc four-cylinder engine remains the same old lump that saw duty in the now discontinued Zephyr range. You can trace the two-valves-per-pot DOHC unit?s family tree right back to the GPz750 of 1983.
At least you know you are buying one of the most reliable engines around, even if with only 76bhp on tap you're not going to light up the tarmac. The exhaust has been tuned for low to mid-range performance, but you'll still see 130mph on the clock.
Like the engine, the frame is also classic Kawasaki, with double-cradle big-bore steel tubes for "stable" handling. The Uni-Track rear suspension has also been around for years. The rear shock is seven-way preload adjustable, with four-way rebound damping adjustment. Steering geometry is tilted towards the tourer, with 25.5 degrees of steering rake and a long, rigid swingarm.
Practical features abound on the ZR-7 range, with grease nipples fitted to the swingarm bushings to prolong life and prevent seizure. The Kwak also comes with a centre stand as standard, making chain lubing and tyre changes much simpler.
The ZR-7 might not be the most exciting bike on the road today, but that hasn't stopped it selling by the shedload. If you are after a comfortable easy-going all-rounder it's still a great buy.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:22 pm

Kawasaki ZX-10R Ninja

The long-awaited ZX-10R is Kawasaki's ultimate supersport machine, with a class-busting power-to-weight ratio and awesome muscle.
Unlike most other Kawasaki machines, the Ninja ZX-10R design started with chassis computer simulations. The engineers wanted an extremely lightweight and compact chassis that would offer superb handling and stability. The combination of a short wheelbase with a long swingarm is a configuration also seen on the Ninja ZX-RR.
An all-aluminium frame with 600-class dimensions mated to a long and highly rigid gull swingarm gives the ZX-10R category-leading handling performance on track and twisty roads.
The incredibly compact new in-line four is a showcase of advanced supersport technology. A number of considerations were made to avoid compromising the desired chassis dimensions, including use of a one-piece cylinder/crankcase, a compact rear-mounted generator and "stacked" transmission kept the high-spec power unit lightweight and compact.
Other engine features include a new fuel injection system - huge 43mm throttle bodies fitted with dual throttle valves ensure massive power output and a smooth, step-free torque curve. The hotter spark of the iridium plugs and high-voltage coils improves combustion efficiency.
Camshaft lobes and tappet surfaces feature soft-nitriding surface treatment for long wear and high-rpm reliability. Sintered aluminium valve spring retainers reduce reciprocating weight for reliable valve control at high-rpm.
Forged pistons are lightweight and very tough, for low reciprocating weight and high heat resistance. Their flat tops enable a compact combustion chamber with improved combustion efficiency. Plated cylinders are long wearing and offer excellent heat dispersion.
Intake air is routed via the central Ram Air duct and through the frame tubes to the airbox.
There's also a close-ratio transmission with a back-torque limiter clutch, and magnesium engine covers.
Sit on the ZX-10R for the first time and you will be amazed that despite its compact size and race-purpose ergonomics, it is by no means cramped. Thanks to an idealised seat/pegs/handlebar relationship and a concave tank top, which allows you to mould to the bike, the 10R puts the rider in a position to take full advantage of the engine's awesome power and the superb chassis response.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:24 pm

Kawasaki ZX-6R Ninja

The 1985 GPZ600R was the first middleweight to offer engine, chassis and aerodynamic performance levels to rival those of larger-displacement models. This tradition continues with the 2005 Ninja ZX-6R.
The new model benefits from a host of modifications to engine, chassis and styling, offering improved performance on both the track and on twisty roads.
Engine developments include new cylinder heads, new cylinders, and oval-shaped sub-throttle valves fed by twin injectors for improved intake efficiency. Larger intake and exhaust valves operated by revised cam profiles also contribute to the overall performance increase, while an exhaust valve integral with the end can improves low and mid-range response.
In short, the new power plant delivers more power (especially on top end), has more linear power characteristics and is more fun to ride.
Form follows function in the stylish new cowl and underseat exhaust can, both of which improve the bike's aerodynamics. The new cowl moves the point where the boundary layer separates from the cowling forward. This not only reduces turbulence around the rider, it significantly shortens the point of convergence at the rear of the machine, greatly improving aerodynamic efficiency.
In fact, the new ZX-6R has the best drag coefficient of any Ninja to date - a feature worth approximately 10 PS at 156mph.
Chassis features include a new aluminium frame, an ultra-trick braced swingarm, a new fork, improved rear suspension settings, and new 10R-type wheels. The new chassis dimensions shorten the wheelbase and move the swingarm pivot point forward for improved cornering performance.
Race-bike features like a direct-action brake master cylinder, radial-mount calipers, petal front brake discs and a back-torque limiter tuned with feedback from Kawasaki's MotoGP machine further increase the 6R's potency on the circuit.
The bodywork that complements the new under-seat exhaust features styling cues from the MotoGP machine and the Ninja ZX-10R. New Ram-Air intake, new headlight design, integrated front turn signals and LED tail lamp give the new 6R an unmistakable resemblance to the 10R.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:25 pm

Kawasaki ZX-9R Ninja

Comfort is not a word that is familiar to the vast majority of supersports bike riders, but that's exactly the reason many owners chose the ZX-9R instead of an R1 or FireBlade.
And the 899cc, liquid-cooled in-line four Ninja has developed a cult following thanks to an unburstable engine that, thanks to the Twin Ram Air system, delivers 142bhp at 11,000rpm and tremendous torque.
Kawasaki claim that the ZX-9R has been substantially updated for 2002, with over 130 modifications all aimed at "delivering real-world performance to sporting riders". That could be taken as an admission that the ZX-9R isn't as balls-out as Suzuki's GSX-R1000 or as focussed as the R1. But Kawasaki is right - the new Ninja is big and comfortable, with useable power from 4000rpm.
Chassis changes include the adoption of a braced swingarm and a change to both the linkage ratios of the rear suspension and stiffer front fork springs. The frame has been completely redesigned, along with the way the engine is mounted. As a result the stiffness and handling qualities are improved.
The new ZX-9R looks sharper too, with a new rear seat cowl, a new front mudguard and graphics. Brakes have been revised as well, with lighter, four-piston caliper units to give improved feel with no reduction in braking power.
Ninja Kawasakis have a strong following in British Superbike - not least because they are so cheap to race, with affordable spare parts and a reliable engine/transmission. Engine improvements for 2002 are centred on enhancing low and mid-range power without loosing the famous Ninja top-end rush.
Crankshaft webs are thicker, again for more inertia, and the exhaust collector has been modified with mid-range performance in mind. After all, that's where real-world riders get their kicks. But the Ninja can also be a civilised motorcycle, pootling around town with a passenger on the back.
The ZX-9R Ninja is better than ever. If you're looking for a big supersports that you can live with, book a test ride now.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:26 pm

Kawasaki ZZ-R1200

Kawasaki have come right out and admitted it. Their flagship sports-tourer is aimed at fast riders who are getting a bit too old and want some comfort in their dotage.
Of course, Big K put it a bit nicer than that. "Although many reasons can be cited for the growing popularity of sport-touring machines," they say, "foremost among them are the large numbers of former supersport riders who, as they grow older, want more comfort without sacrificing the sporty handling and high engine performance to which they have grown accustomed."
With the new Kawasaki Ninja ZX-12R and ZX-9R getting even harder-edged supersport performance in '02, the ZZ-R1200 meets the needs of those many riders who want to both carve through the twisties and tour to the sun. The new ZZ-R1200 sport-tourer is the answer.
The ZZ-R1200 is based on the famous ZZ-R1100 superbike, with its unassailable reputation for high-speed performance. It gives sport-touring riders everything they demand in a high-performance sport-touring machine: awesome engine, sporty handling and high comfort.
Although the new machine shares much of its design with the original ZZ-R1100, significant modifications to the chassis, engine and bodywork make the ZZ-R1200 an entirely new machine. The most obvious modification to the engine is the increase in displacement from 1052cc to 1164cc. Less obvious is that the new cylinder is an all-alloy unit with plated bores, new water jackets, and it is held down by a new bolt pattern.
New cases house a more durable close-ratio six-speed transmission with smoother shifting, and the CVKD 40mm carburetors are now fitted with throttle position sensors for improved response and more linear power delivery. The engine has also been retuned for more mid-range torque and less emphasis on top speed.
Since touring riders want some creature comforts on those long hauls, alternator output and battery size have both been upped, while an under-seat socket means hooking up touring accessories like heated vests, coffee-makers and the CD player couldn't be easier. A range of optional touring equipment, including side bags, is also available.
Improvements to the chassis have been no less significant and were aimed at improving ride quality and comfort while enhancing the bike's sporty handling characteristics. Modifications include a new, stiffer frame, new fork and rear suspension, new brakes and wheels and, most obviously, the elegant new fairing, tank and bodywork with sophisticated automotive-type front and rear lights and an attractive new instrument panel.
The ergonomics have also been improved, with the bars moved further rearward and the pegs lowered, allowing the rider to comfortably mould himself to the ergonomically designed tank and seat.
But Kawasaki have not forgotten the reason the ZZ-R1100 won an army of hard-core fans. The 160bhp ZZ-R1200 will hustle you and your passenger along at over 170mph for as long as there are less than 12 points on your license.

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Re: Kawasaki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 7:28 pm

Kawasaki ZZ-R600

Ask any hard-core tourer what they are looking for when it comes to choosing a new machine and top of the list will be comfort, great weather protection and luggage capacity - with no compromise on performance.
Kawasaki's ZZ-R600 might be only a 600, but it effortlessly manages to hit the button - and there's a big plus. At just 195kg it is a lot lighter than most sports tourers.
When it was introduced in the early 1990s the ZZ-R was the fastest 600 on the road. Then Honda, Suzuki and Yamaha all put out better supersports 600, leaving the ZZ-R600 trailing. But as a sports tourer it excels, and Kawasaki later hit back with the ZX6-RR.
The ZZ-R600 is a bike for the real world, easily capable of covering big mileage in a day or getting you to work on time every morning - without a pain in the neck. Like its bigger stablemate the ZZ-R1200, the 600 is loaded with high-tech features, with all the hallmarks of legendary ZZ-R performance in a lightweight, compact and stylish package. The generous and plush seat is just as comfortable on the way to work as it is on a trip round Europe.
Super sweet, slick and responsive, the 599cc liquid cooled, 16-valve motor combines a sporting nature with touring torque and flexibility for a fulfilling ride. The six-speeder pumps out a claimed 100bhp - 11 less than the full-on ZX6-RR Ninja supersports.
Front fork has 41mm stanchions, while there's the familiar bottom-link Uni-Trak at the rear, with an extruded aluminium swingarm.
The brakes are easily good enough for such a lightweight - even fully loaded - with 300mm twin discs and opposed four-piston calipers up front, and a 240mm disc with single piston caliper at the rear. A fuel gauge and clock come as standard.
The fairing is a lot more effective than what is available on the current batch of supersports 600s, so you get practical weather protection. This sporty tourer may be the perfect all-around middleweight sports bike. One that's nimble enough to take on city traffic but with the solid big-bike credentials necessary for that big trip whenever you are ready.

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Re: Kawasaki

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