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» Yamaha
Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:42 am by Admin

» Suzuki
Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:38 pm by Admin

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Suzuki

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Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 5:28 pm

Suzuki DR-Z400

The DR-Z400S is Suzuki's answer to the search for the perfect all-rounder, a motorcycle capable of taking you to work on weekdays and performing on the berms and ruts of a motocross track at the weekends. Hey, you could even fulfil that dream and finally ride around the world on one of these.
With lights and a proper silencer this is a fully street legal version of Suzuki's dedicated DR-Z400E off-roader. The punchy liquid cooled 398cc, four-stroke DOHC single grunts out torque for grinding through traffic or deep mud, as well as giving the sort of top end power you'll appreciate when it comes to nipping through gaps in the traffic or launching off a jump.
To keep weight down the Suzi features a thin wall chrome-moly steel frame that has been designed to achieve torsional rigidity in spite of its minimal weight.
The long travel front fork with 49mm stanchion tubes can soak up just about anything you are going to throw at it, while the long travel rear shock connects to the swingarm via a progressive linkage so that the action is more controlled.
A nice touch is the clutch cover which can be removed without draining the engine coolant for easier maintenance. The air filter can be replaced without tools.
This is one all-rounder that is tops off-road, so you'll appreciate the aluminium bash plate that protects the engine. But you won't miss out on the usual road-going equipment. The DR-Z400S comes with an electric start and the instrument cluster includes a speedometer, odometer, twin trip meters with addition and subtraction facility, a clock, timer and stopwatch.
With long-travel suspension and bodywork plastics designed for a hard life, the DR-Z400S can take anything you throw at it.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:17 pm

Suzuki G600 Bandit

The Suzuki Bandit set a new class standard when it was launched in 1995. Demand was so high that some punters were even paying over list price to get hold of one.
The Bandit's reputation was built on a 600cc in-line four engine that was basically a sleeved down oil-cooled GSR750 motor. With 16 valves and dual overhead cams tuned to deliver plenty of punch in the mid-range the Bandit could pop wheelies at the flick of a wrist. It also handled better than it had any right to, and the chunky good looks gave it instant street cred.
The Bandit was updated in 2000. The 600S has fatter radial tires and a low seat. An aerodynamic windscreen features a scoop at the bottom to create a venturi effect for more comfort, plus stability. And new dual projector headlamps and twin tail lamps let you see and be seen better.
The Bandit's evolution even included a modification to its signature exposed double-cradle frame. For a leaner, sharper look, it forms a straighter line as it passes under the fuel tank, through the new seat rail, to the tip of its tail. A longer wheelbase contributes to straight-line stability.
It also enabled Suzuki to reduce the rake angle and the trail to make steering light and responsive. The new geometry places more of the wheelbase length behind the engine to bring the balance point forward for good control. New suspension components add to the pleasure of open road performance as well as contribute to durability. And larger caliper pistons have been added to the dual front disc brakes.
Keihin CVR32 carbs coupled with a new throttle position sensor with four-step independent mapping help the latest Bandit strike with more low-end power.
Look beneath the non-slip leather seat and you'll find enough storage room for a U-lock and light rain gear. And the list of features for easy living goes on and on. A contoured grab bar integrated with the tail cowl. A bungee hook for extra luggage. Beautifully shaped bolt-on passenger footpegs. And the newly designed centre stand takes less effort to lift the bike.
Yamaha's Fazer and Honda's Hornet may have overtaken the Bandit, but it's still a great buy if the price is right.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:18 pm

Suzuki GFS1200 Bandit

The 1200 Bandit is the original muscle bike. Launched in 1996 the big brother to the hugely successful 600 Bandit added the one thing that Junior was missing - masses of grunt.
Since then the 1200 Bandit has developed a strong following. This is a bike that can do almost anything - touring, long distance commuting, cruising, scratching, stunting or you can ride it like a very sensible person wearing a Sam Brown belt. You name it and someone is doing it right now and loving every minute.
The upright riding position means that you don't suffer from sportsbike neck and your wrists won't ache after a ride through town. The big Bandit was updated for 2001 and the twin-headlight half-faired 1200S introduced to make high speed cruising less of a drag.
The latest versions of the GSF1200 feature large 43mm diameter front forks with adjustable preload. There is a lightweight, box-section aluminium swingarm to resist twisting.
The monoshock rear suspension has seven preload adjustments, four-way rebound damping and a movable gas/oil separator so there's plenty to twiddle about with.
The engine is based on the air/oil cooled GSX-R1100 mill, but detuned and geared down for eyeball spinning acceleration. Power output from the DOHC 16-valve unit is 99bhp at 8500rpm.
So you'll be needing decent brakes - especially if you are into stoppies. How about a pair of Tokico six-piston calipers to squeeze the life out of the 310mm rotors?
The gas tank holds a decent 20-litres, and the radial tyres have been selected for high mileage but there's nothing to stop you from slapping some sticky rubber on the three-spoke alloy rims. There's even a centre stand that is designed with a high leverage ratio for easy operation.
For 2004 the 1200 Bandit gets a new stainless 4-into-1 exhaust system with an aluminium can that is claimed to increase low and midrange power.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:19 pm

Suzuki GS500E

Okay, so you are not going to turn heads if you arrive at Brands Hatch and park your GS500 Suzuki alongside the GSX-R race reps and 996 Ducatis. Then again, nobody buys a commuter for pose value.
But if you are tired of the long hours you spend travelling to work every day, stuck in traffic jams or standing on railway platforms, then the GS500 is the answer to your prayers.
Although the parallel twin GS500 has been updated for 2001, it is beginning to show its age - Suzuki added it to the range in 1989 as a cheap sportsbike. The latest model features short one-piece handlebars, a larger sculpted fuel tank, new seat, tail piece and rear light. There's also a frame-mounted passenger grab bar.
But it is still an economical commuter, with a reputation for day-in, day-out reliability. It is also pretty light for a full-size motorcycle at 173kg (381lb) dry. Compliant suspension gives a comfortable ride around. The front fork is adjustable for preload, while the rear suspension features a seven-way adjustable spring.
The silver-painted steel chassis gives plenty of feedback, and the low-maintenance 51bhp four-stroke, air-cooled DOHC 487cc motor has enough stomp to beat any sales rep in his Mondeo away from the lights.
Top speed is a touch over 110mph, and you should get over 50mpg. That's a range of 220 miles from the 4.4-gallon (20-litre) petrol tank.
Loads of training schools use the GS500 to teach riders the basics. So if the bike can stand the abuse of a new learner every day, you know it's built to last.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:21 pm

Suzuki GS500F

You might be dreaming of owning a GSX-R600, but when you wake up and check your bank balance it might be time for a reality check. And that's when you'll take another look at Suzuki's affordable GS500F.
Based on the good old GS500, the F comes with a full fairing that bears more than a passing resemblance to the GSX-R600's. But the engine is the same 487cc parallel twin that was updated for 2001.
The low-maintenance four-stroke, air-cooled DOHC motor is beginning to show its age - Suzuki added the GS500 to the range in 1989 as a cheap sportsbike.
But it is still an economical commuter, with a reputation for day-in, day-out reliability. It is also pretty light for a full-size motorcycle at 180kg (up 6kg on the naked GS500). Electronic ignition and twin Mikuni carbs keep service costs to a minimum, while the oil cooler on this air-cooled four-valve engine stops things getting too hot under the fairing.
This Suzi might be pretty basic but it still has enough stomp to beat any sales rep's Vauxhall away from the lights if you buzz the six-speed box.The brakes are as basic as the engine, with a single two-piston caliper disc up front and the same at the rear. Compliant suspension gives a comfortable ride - the front fork is adjustable for preload, while the rear suspension features a link-type seven-way adjustable spring.

The black-painted double cradle steel frame has an easy job cradling the lightweight 51bhp motor and the chassis gives plenty of feedback.
Top speed is a shade over 110mph, and you should get over 50mpg. That's a range of 220 miles from the 4.4-gallon (20-litre) petrol tank.
Loads of training schools use the GS500 to teach riders the basics. So if the bike can stand the abuse of a new learner every day, you know it's built to last.
The GS500 hasn't got a brilliant reputation for build quality, so expect some corrosion after a hard winter. But when you check out the deals you can get on one of these commuter classics you'll see that it's still a bargain.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:22 pm

Suzuki GSX1300R Hayabusa

The Hayabusa is the fastest production motorcycle in the world, with a top speed in excess of 195mph and the ability to hit 130 at the end of a quarter-mile strip.
Named after a Japanese falcon, the Hayabusa is the most aerodynamic Suzuki ever built. It is powered by Suzuki's biggest, most powerful four-cylinder sportsbike engine.
The digital electronic fuel injection system uses eight sensors on the crank assembly to maximise efficiency, while the electronic ignition system uses individual ignition coils built into the spark plug caps
The sweeping curves of the fairing, wrap-around front mudguard and strange seat hump combine to give the Hayabusa its low drag coefficient, allowing it to slip through the air with minimum turbulence and so maximise speed without upsetting the handling.
The twin-spar frame and braced aluminium swingarm were developed from Suzuki's WSB experience. The 43mm inverted fork comes with adjustable spring preload, compression and rebound damping, and uses aluminium internal components to reduce weight. Rear suspension is courtesy of a piggyback-reservoir shock, with adjustable spring preload and compression and rebound damping.
The aerodynamic design works well, but the rounded-off look isn't to everyone's taste. And it is a bit lardy for a supersport bike - the big Suzy weighs in at 215kg (474lb) making it a handful through country curves if you are riding at the limit.
But the 'Busa is not intimidating to ride. The massive torque lets you burble through city traffic in any gear that you happen to be in.
The Hayabusa excels as a long-distance sports tourer, with 170 miles before fill-ups.
But be wary about fixing hard luggage systems to the alloy rear subframe - this has been known to break on early models. And the rear subframe is what keeps your pillion passenger's bum off the back wheel?
Some magazines claimed a maximum speed of 200mph from the original Hayabusa. The 2001 model has the same engine pumping out 175bhp at the crank, but it has been electronically limited to 'only' 185mph to placate the authorities.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:23 pm

Suzuki GSX1400

You want a muscle bike and you want it big? Take a look at the GSX1400 - it's the biggest naked four-cylinder on the market. And you get a lot of motorcycle for your money.
List price is 6499 on the road, and for that you get a fuel injected 1402cc air-and-oil cooled dohc motor wrapped up in a pretty basic chassis with twin rear shocks, but at least they are piggyback reservoir shocks with adjustable rebound and compression damping. Spring preload is easy to adjust, with a convenient dial-type hydraulic pressure adjuster. The forks are adjustable for preload, rebound and compression damping.
You wanted big, and you've got it. The GSX1400 weighs in at 228kg. That's a lot of metal to haul up from 140mph, so the front stoppers are 320mm floating discs with aluminium six-piston calipers. There's a 260mm disc with a two-piston caliper at the back to steady the plot.
The retro GSX1400 isn't designed for speed - who wants to hang on to a naked bike above 140 anyway? Power output is limited to a Euro-friendly 104.5bhp but it runs out of steam above 8000rpm.
What the long stroke (81.0 x 68.0mm bore x stroke) engine delivers is loads of torque at low and mid range revs - we're talking 93ft-lb at just 5000rpm. Compare that to Harley's Road King. That's supposed to be the torque king but you get a measly 78ft-lb.
Although the GSX1400 is a big bike with a 790mm seat height, Suzuki have kept the frame reasonably narrow at the back of the petrol tank and made the seat slim so that shorter riders can still plant their feet on the road.
You can run this bike as a commuter or ride it like a hooligan. You could even go touring on it thanks to the 22-litre (4.8 gallons) tank. That's good for over 200 miles if you keep your cruising speed around 80mph.
If the GSX1400's engine looks familiar it's because it is a bigger version of the cheaper 1200 Bandit. And that's no bad thing. You don't blow this engine up.
Colour options are classic blue and white, or solid blue or silver.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:25 pm

Suzuki GSX-R1000

Just two years ago, Suzuki launched the critically acclaimed GSX-R1000 with the aim of "owning the racetrack" and it has done just that.
The GSX-R1000 has been at the front in the Isle of Man, in the British Superstock Championship, Masters of Endurance, FIM Endurance World Championship and in national championships around the world.
But with its mission to stay at the forefront of technological innovation and stay ahead of the competition, Suzuki has completely up-rated its flagship model to give it the highest output and acceleration in its class.
The new GSX-R1000 has lost a little weight, gained new styling for improved aerodynamics, and improved efficiency in its ram-air charging system.
The 988cc in-line four's fuel injection and exhaust control module now features a 32-bit module instead of 16-bit, improving engine response and combustion efficiency while reducing exhaust emissions.
The fuel injection throttle bodies are now dual double barrel instead of the earlier four single-barrel throttle bodies. This makes the system lighter and simpler.
From stacked headlights to the trick LED tail-light, the 2003 GSX-R1000 has been revised into a stronger, lighter, faster package. An all-new twin-spar, black-painted aluminium-alloy frame adds to the sharp new look. The steering head section and swingarm pivot-plate are both cast with internal reinforcing ribs for greater rigidity. The swingarm pivot can be adjusted up or down via eccentric spacers for fine-tuning the handling - the spacers are supplied only as part of a race kit.
Even the brakes are improved - and those were amongst the best around on the "old" Thou. The new GSX-R1000 gets radial-mounted, four-piston front brake callipers straight from the MotoGP racetrack, where the system is used on the GSV-R.
Instead of the caliper bodies being bolted to the forks transversely (in line with the wheel spindles) the calipers are now bolted radially, in towards the hub. This means that the mounts and calipers are far more rigidly fixed, and so they can't flex as much under hard braking.
At 168kg, the GSX-R1000 has the lightest dry weight in its class. It looks like the big Suzuki is going to dominate racetracks again in 2003. The FireBlade might steer better and the R1 might look sharper, but nothing can match the GSX-R1000's explosive motor. Road riders with enough skill to handle it will make it the top sportsbike again.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:26 pm

Suzuki GSX-R600

In the frantic world of 600cc race reps the Suzuki is still top screamer. Although the 600 used to be indistinguishable from a GSX-R750, and shares the 750's bottom end, the smaller four must be whipped like a Grand National winner its final furlong to perform.
So the GSX-R is a track-day dream and a road nightmare if what you discover you needed all along was a tractable CBR600. Serious maniac? Step this way. Vertically challenged loony? Even better: a Gixer's rather cramped. The 155mph Suzuki's major advantages are stunning looks, a short twin-spar alloy frame, widely tunable suspension and a well sorted engine that won't stop revving.
Alongside Twin Swirl Combustion Chambers and SRAD ram-air, there's fully digital ignition. Best of all, the 600 was so good that it was virtually unchanged in its first four years, but still able to keep up with lighter Yamaha R6s and Kawasaki ZX-6Rs. Unlike Honda's CBR, the Suzuki won't play tourer. This is a toy, not transport.
Every used Gixer has been thrashed, which makes servicing at 4000 and 15,000 mile intervals even more important. Check which model you're looking at, because it may be a grey import. Look carefully for evidence of race use, a legal exhaust and crash damage. Camchain tensioners can be trouble.
Evidence of servicing is vital, so ask to see it. Don't be shy about asking why the bike's for sale. Often, it's mayhem in someone's personal life, which is useful information in negotiating a price.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:27 pm

Suzuki GSX-R750

Suzuki started the race replica class more than 15 years ago with the GSX, but the 750 was until recently overshadowed by lighter 600s that offered the same power, and 1000s that were just as light but packed a bigger punch.
Now Suzuki has upped its game with three of the hottest sportsbikes on offer: the GSX-R 600, 750 and 1000. Line these brothers up side by side, and at first glance only the decals on the tailpiece indicating the capacity sets them apart.
But check the clocks and you'll notice that the 1000 redlines at 12,250, the 750 at 14,00 and the 600 at 14,500rpm.
Look closer and you'll see that the 600 carries traditional forks, the 750's are upside-down units, and the 1000's are titanium nitride-coated. And while the 600 has a conventional box section alloy swingarm, the 750 has extra bracing while the 1000 features a double box section swingarm.
In terms of outright performance, the GSX-R1000 is the clear winner, while the 600 offers the highest power-output and best power to weight ratio in its class. But the GSX-R750 combines the best of both worlds with an incredible combination of power, flickability and speed through corners.
The ultra-light 166kg GSX-R750 has a twin-spar aluminium chassis based on the RGV500 Grand Prix bike, to make it shorter, narrower and lighter than ever before. It uses exotic magnesium for the oil pan and cambox, clutch, starter, generator and cylinder head covers.
An advanced 16-bit digital engine management system and dual throttle valve fuel injection makes sure the power comes in hard and strong, without the jerkiness that other injected bikes sometimes suffer from. Power output is a claimed 139bhp @ 10,500rpm. Top speed is 168mph.
Don't expect a relaxing ride from the GSX-R750. This is a bike focused on the track.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:30 pm

Suzuki GZ125 Marauder

With its megaphone style silencer and deeply valanced mudguards the GZ 125 looks like it can't make its mind up whether it wants to be a boy racer or a cruiser. Fortunately Suzuki hasn't got any doubts, and pitches the little Marauder squarely at the learner cruiser market.
The single overhead cam engine is based on the old GN 125 single cylinder engine, and that is no bad thing. This is a solid, reliable motorcycle that will take the sort of abuse only a learner will subject a motorcycle to.
And it is also cheap to service - surely an important consideration if you are just starting out and have hefty insurance premiums to pay as well.
Power output is 12bhp at 9500rpm, which means the single disc up front and the drum at the rear should be good enough to keep you out of trouble. The raked front fork and classic twin rear shocks with pre-load adjustment are also basic. But what do you expect? This is not a pricey motorcycle.
The pulled back handlebar and low seat height - we're talking just 680mm here - means that the junior Marauder is better suited to shorter riders. Lanky riders will feel cramped, in spite of footrests that are hung in front of the engine. The claimed 125kg dry weight is also attractive to lightweight learners.
With just 12bhp available you are not going to use this motorcycle to pull tractors, but the easy going performance soon wins you over? especially when you remember how cheap to run this little Suzi is. It barely sips petrol so the 14-litre gas tank should hold enough to take you almost 300 miles.
Good value and an excellent first time learner bike, the GZ 125 Marauder is a great introduction to motorcycling.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:31 pm

Suzuki SV650

Suzuki scored instant hits with the naked SV650 and faired SV650S V-twins. By producing a budget-price 650 with character, looks and outstanding handling they've made people who might otherwise buy a 600 Bandit think again.
To promote responsive handling the tubular alloy truss frame is very short. That's not easy with a Ducati-style 90 degree V-twin. By tipping the front cylinder back, simplifying the drive to the camshafts and stacking fourth fifth and sixth gears above and behind first, second and third the seemingly impossible was achieved.
Add a very long box-section swingarm and these V-twins handle like a dream. The 654cc engine is liquid-cooled, with double overhead camshafts, eight valves, twin 39mm downdraught carbs and digital electronic ignition. Top speed is 119mph for the SV650 and 125mph for the 650S.
Despite budget suspension components, neither Suzuki looks as if it's built down to a price. Each version has a different riding position and gearing. With a higher and wider handlebar, the SV650 has lower overall gearing than the faired S, with its clip-on handlebars. Both models appeal to experienced riders looking for good value. Weight has been cut with the use of plastic engine covers.
The ignition lock is fitted with a tamper-proof steel ring and attempts at hot-wiring shut the ignition down. The fact that Suzuki is selling these 650 engines to Cagiva means that they have no worries about reliability, and neither should you.
Both twins are an awful lot of bike for precious little money.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:32 pm

Suzuki TL1000R

Superbike successor to Suzuki's torquey and well liked TL1000S, the highly tuned 135PS TL1000R is a 165mph beast that oozes charisma.
Its engine is a 90-degree liquid-cooled V-twin with double overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder and fuel injection. But cam timings are far more radical than those used on the supersport TL1000S. An aerodynamic full fairing contains ram air induction scoops and hot air exit ducts. There are two radiators instead of one to improve heat dispersion and even the oil cooler is liquid cooled. A second fuel injector is activated at high revs.

The engine closely resembles a race-ready unit and comes in an exceptionally high state of tune for the road. Early S models soon developed a reputation for unpredictable handling, damaging sales. As a result the chassis was revised and an unusual rotary steering damper was relocated. The frame is a massive twin-spar alloy design and the swingarm is braced from below in superbike racing style. The TL1000R has an upside-down front fork with 45mm stanchions. Its front mudguard is shaped to counteract lift at high speed.
Front suspension is matched to damping on the rear wheel, maintained by temperature-compensating needles. Awesome stopping power is guaranteed by twin 320mm disc rotors and Tokico six-pot calipers. Overshadowed by the pace of Suzuki's own GSX1300R Hayabusa, the TL1000R is aimed at riders who want to own a potential superbike racer that will be expensive to run.
Obvious alternatives are Honda's VTR1000 SP-1 and the accomplished Aprilia RSV Mille.

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:35 pm

Suzuki VL125 Intruder

The Intruder is up against some stiff competition in the 125 cruiser market. Honda's VT125 Shadow and Yamaha's XVS125 Dragstar are both great little bikes so buyers really are spoilt for choice.
But the Suzuki still hit the spot when it was launched in 2000, quickly becoming the best selling custom in the UK. The three valves per cylinder 124cc air cooled four-stroke is a neat design, with single overhead cam operation and a healthy 13.3bhp at a heady 10,500rpm from the 65 degree V-twin.
Cruising at 50mph is relaxed, with fifth gear acting as an overdrive. The engine has been tuned for torque and the two chrome exhausts emit a rather pleasing noise as well - you want to live the cruiser dream, after all.
At 685mm the low saddle height makes the VL 125 Intruder a perfect bike for learners, and as they can't carry a pillion passenger they'll probably take off the removable pillion seat so that the bike has leaner lines. Dry weight is only 140kg so the Intruder is easy to handle as well. Stopping is taken care of by a single disc up front and a drum at the rear.
There are two classic shock absorbers at the rear, with five-way pre-load adjustment. The raked out front end and fat tyres contribute to the long, lean cruiser image and delivers easy handling at speed. The foot forward riding position is comfortable, and the 12-litre tank means you can fill up and head off into the sunset without worrying about where you are going to gas up.
Riding two-up might make the 125 V-twin work hard and you'll probably spend more time in fourth than fifth gear. But hey - pass your test you can move up to the VL1600 Intruder?

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:37 pm

Suzuki VL800 Intruder

It may have a new name, but the Intruder Volusia uses an engine that's basically the same as the old VZ800 Marauder's 805cc lump. And that's no bad thing, because the engine has been tuned for grunt at low rpm and easy riding. Get into top as soon as possible - and stay there, riding the torque curve.
Introduced for 2001, this middleweight cruiser is dressed up with fully valanced fenders front and rear (calling them mudguards would be so damn British?), pull-back handlebars, and forward mounted footpegs. Staggered twin exhausts are tuned to give a throaty rumble that Suzuki technicians can be proud of.
Although it looks like a traditional air-cooled motor, the single overhead cam, liquid cooled engine features a digital ignition system married to a catalytic converter to keep those emissions clean when you're California dreamin'. A shaft drive means long term reliability even if the shaft saps power from the 50bhp V-twin.
Front brake is a two-piston 300mm disc, with spoked wheels adding to the retro look. Fat, chrome fork tubes and a gas tank mounted speedometer give the Harley clone the right street presence.
The gently sprung single rear shock makes sure the ride is always comfortable, but you still get that hard tail cruiser look. The low seat height of just 700mm means the Volusia is easy to control, park and steer.
But what's all this Volusia nonsense about, anyway? Suzuki named the full-dresser Intruder after Volusia County in Florida. Close to Daytona Beach, it's a place where American bikers gather to drink Bud and talk motorcycles.
The long and low Intruder retails at 5550. That's about half the cost of a Harley. With such an affordable price and great ride quality it's got to be worth a look

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Re: Suzuki

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:38 pm

Suzuki XF650 Freewind

Aimed at the same niche created by the BMW F650 Funduro and head to head with Honda's 644cc Vigor, the Freewind is an 'urban trailbike.' For the confused, Suzuki's description translates as a road bike that only looks like a trailie.
So the Suzuki isn't truly dual purpose. Mountain roads are about as far off the beaten track as you'd want to go on a swoopy 644cc four-valve single with a plastic engine bashplate. Points that sell the 95mph Freewind are its adjustable seat - but check to see if your inside leg measures up - and SACS oil-plus-air cooling. The second oil pump and cooling circuit has been a feature of Suzukis since 1985, saving weight on water-cooled designs. That coolant rad is an oil cooler.
Strong mid-range torque and a sharp throttle response from twin Mikuni carbs give the Freewind an ability to slice through jams and cruise at 80mph. A headlamp fairing that blends into the tank diverts windblast from the rider, who sits upright. There's plenty of room for a passenger, a built-in rack and big disc brakes.
Freewind owners tend to be Captain Sensible types who like the poise, ground clearance and yards of suspension travel comfort that comes with a trail bike without wanting to get sweaty and mud-spattered. They are careful, low-mileage types who get bikes serviced on schedule or do it themselves.
And because the Freewind has sold so slowly you should be able to drive a hard bargain.

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