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» Yamaha
Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:42 am by Admin

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Yamaha

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Yamaha

Post by Admin on Thu Jul 17, 2008 5:39 pm

Yamaha BT1100 Bulldog

The Bulldog breed is tough, resilient, and hard as nails. But this Bulldog is the Yamaha BT1100, and if it were a dog it would be more likely to roll over and beg you to scratch its belly than rip your arm off.
Think faithful Labrador and you get the picture - but who'd want to buy a bike named after the nation's friendliest old dog?
The Bulldog doesn't look like a big softy. Aggressive styling with a thick-walled tubular backbone chassis caging a 1063cc V-twin motor, humped gas tank and gunslinger seat promise arm-wrenching performance for the streetfighter clan. But Yamaha has a different rider in mind.
This bike is not meant to be thrashed like a V-Max or Fazer 1000. It was designed for weekend warriors who enjoy looking cool, but without frightening the neighbours. "The way we see it, five days hard work deserves to be rewarded with at least two days of full-on fun!" purrs the Yamaha marketing type. "And the new BT1100 is the ultimate in weekend riding pleasure."
The Bulldog is also the first Yam to be built in Italy. That goes some way to explain the mixed-up personality of the BT1100.
The Bulldog's engine is basically the same unit that powers the 1100 Drag Star Classic, and that was based on the venerable Virago lump that dates back to Neanderthal times. The V-twin is pretty simple, with air-cooling and a single overhead cam. Compression is a soft 8.3:1, and power is claimed to be 65bhp.
The Bulldog gets a bigger air box to boost torque throughout the rev range. But by the time those horses reach the shaft-drive back wheel they've probably been reigned in to about 50bhp. R1-style front brakes make sure the Bulldog doesn't run away.
As a "naked musclebike" the Bulldog falls short on muscle - especially as it is in the same price range as Yamaha's own muscle retro XJR1300 and Suzuki's GSX1400. Check them all out before you buy.

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:24 am

Yamaha DT125R

As a learner bike the DT is simply brilliant. You use and abuse this road and trail bike and it just keeps coming back for more - hardly surprising when you realise that Yamaha introduced the 125cc stroker way back in 1988.
To pass your motorcycle test you have to master the U-turn, but on a DT you're laughing - the low first gear means you can trickle along without slipping the clutch. The wheelbase is longer than most street learner bikes like the Honda CG125 or Yamaha's own chunky wheeled TW125, but there's masses of steering lock and the turning circle is amazingly small.
Knobbly tires may not be the best rubber for emergency stops, but you'll have no problems coming quickly and safely to a halt thanks to disc brakes front and rear. And you'll be laughing when it comes to slaloming through the test cones.
Developed from the YZ motocross race bikes, the DT125R is one very special 125. Its tough chassis, long-travel suspension and 13.9bhp liquid-cooled two-stroke engine mean that exploring off-road trails is great fun.
With its comfortable upright riding position, wide handlebars and long dual seat, this rugged lightweight has got to be one of the best ways to move around town. You can see over the tops of cars, increasing your chances of staying out of trouble as you slice through jams.
And when you pass your test you can easily de-restrict the motor and fit an aftermarket exhaust system. Then 90mph performance is possible - stunning stuff from a 125 trailie.

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:25 am

Yamaha FZS600 Fazer

Right from the start the original FZS600 Fazer proved to be an outstanding success story for Yamaha. Shown for the first time at the Paris Show in late 1997, this truly versatile middleweight offered a winning blend of performance, style, easy handling and economy.
The first generation Fazer's engine was developed from the super-sport YZF600R Thunder Cat, and was slotted in a double cradle steel frame. Now the new generation FZ6 Fazer builds on the strengths of the original and offers today's riders even higher levels of engine and chassis performance combined with reduced weight, increased versatility and even more sophisticated styling.
The FZS600 is the faired version of the naked FZ600. Both models use the same 599cc liquid cooled 97bhp motor - a detuned version of the YZF-R6 supersport. The latest generation Fazers might make more power, but although the engine thrives on revs some riders will prefer the extra torque of the old engine.
For an ideal combination of light weight and good rigidity, the updated Fazer gets an aluminium die-cast beam frame produced with Yamaha's CF Die Cast Technology instead of the steel frame.
The 43mm front fork is the same size as on the Fazer 1000 (41 mm on the 2003 Fazer 600). To accommodate this, the pitch in the fork has been increased from 190 to 210mm and the handlebar crown is now a single cast aluminium unit with the upper bracket.
The Monocross rear suspension gives the new Fazer an action that feels as good as link-equipped suspension. With sport settings, the rear wheel travel can be increased to 130mm (10mm more than before).
Modifying the petrol tank design has allowed an increased steering lock so that the Fazer can be turned tighter for greater manoeuvrability in city riding.
The new windscreen provides good wind protection while also producing minimum turbulence and wind noise. This screen surrounds the front of the body cowl and creates a dashboard appearance from the rider's point of view, with the liquid crystal meter panel and the integrated tachometer and speedometer in the middle.
The latest FZS600 Fazer is an outstanding package with a distinctive character that will deliver the goods - whether sports riding, touring or commuting.

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:26 am

Yamaha TDM900

A decade after the first TDM850 appeared, Yamaha has taken its big twin one step further with the launch of a new-generation TDM900.
Lighter and more powerful than its legendary predecessor, the latest TDM delivers quicker acceleration, more agile handling, and stronger braking.
With an innovative 270-degree crank that gives a staggered firing sequence, the TDM900's engine pumps out massive heaps of torque for effortless overtaking and accelerating out of tight corners. And when you are in a more relaxed frame of mind this flexible twin loves to purr along the backroads with minimum effort.
The forks have a generous 150mm of travel - about half that of a dedicated trail bike, but still much more than your average supersports. The rear shock has been redesigned with full adjustment to make it better suited to fast solo riding or two-up touring. And the brakes have been pinched from the R1 and R6 sportsbikes, so there is masses of stopping power.
The engine has been moved slightly forward in the frame, and tipped back into a more upright position. This brings the weight distribution closer to the ideal of 50/50 front to rear, and makes space for a roomier seat and passenger grabrail.
The aluminium Deltabox frame and 40mm longer swingarm of the new TDM900 help slash the weight by 8kg compared to the TDM850. The chassis is also more rigid for better high-speed stability.
The 900 remains true to the original TDM concept of a neat balance between sports bike performance and big trailie practicality. The TDM has always been popular on the Continent, but we Brits have been stuck in a supersports rut for too long. With lower insurance and better economy, the TDM900 is a bike you can live with day in, day out.

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:28 am

Yamaha XJ600S Diversion

Both bikes are all-rounders, a solo sports ride or two-up tourer. But they do look dated alongside a Fazer. Who cares? The original retro XJ600S is the best used bargain because its frame mounted fairing is so efficient.
Naked XJ600Ns were super-cheap in 2001, and your offer should reflect this fact. Often owned by older riders who like the relaxed riding position and the simplicity of air-cooling and eight valves, look for a low mileage, Datatagged Diversion with a hugger and a Scott oiler fitted to extend chain life. Both frame and swingarm are steel, and suspension is basic.
Fully faired Diversions are rare. Some paint schemes, such as the dark green and blue, make a Diversion look duller than the red or maroon. Hard riders should look for late versions with twin 320mm front discs rather than the earlier single disc. Poor starting may be a failing diaphragm fuel pump, replaced by an electric pump. Mikuni CV carb diaphragms are expensive, but servicing is cheap and the original finish is excellent.
Although those crossover exhaust header pipes are stainless, the rest of the system rots, so examine header-to-can connections. Brake caliper seals are also notorious for creeping out past their pistons, causing pad drag and disc wear. Spin both wheels with the bike on its centre stand to check for dragging.

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:31 am

Yamaha XJ900S Diversion

Great value, functional and stylish, the XJ900S Diversion is one of the few large capacity bikes that really can be described as a true all-rounder. Much of this proven machine's legendary versatility is due to the simple dohc air-cooled in-line four cylinder engine and hassle-free shaft drive.
If you are looking for a manageable long distance tourer and two-up comfort is at the top of your list of priorities, then the 900cc Divvy is a pretty good bet. Passengers won't feel cramped because the seat is generously long, and the footpegs are positioned low - your pillion won't have their knees under their armpits on a 900 Diversion.
The front forks are adjustable for preload, while the rear monoshock has a rising rate linkage and also features adjustable preload.
There is little vibration from the in-line four, partly thanks to the rubber engine mounts, so the Divvy is never tiring to ride. Practical features include large mirrors, plenty of bungee hooks for strapping down luggage, a half-fairing that keeps wind pressure off rider and passenger, and optional 34- or 46-litre panniers.
The XJ900S is an eminently sensible motorcycle, and for some that's a virtue. But others will find the 90bhp barely enough to hustle along 239kg of motorcycle to its 130mph top speed. In fact, the 900 makes less power than the FZS600 Fazer, which has another 5bhp on tap - and only 189kg to haul.
But this misses the point. The Divvy is aimed at a different market and the 61.5ft-lb of torque (the Fazer has a claimed 45ft-lb at 9500rpm) means that it will pull cleanly for easy overtaking, whichever one of the five gears you're in. Expect 40mpg when two-up touring. Now where did you put those maps?

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:32 am

Yamaha XJR1300

Featuring a relaxed, upright riding position, high-torque air-cooled engine and high specification braking and suspension systems, the Yamaha XJR 1300 has established a reputation as being one of the most enjoyable and easy to ride musclebikes in the large capacity class.
For 2002 a number of changes have been made both to the engine and chassis which not only reduce overall weight by a full 6kg, but also give the bike a slimmer mid-section. Together with its enhanced braking and suspension performance, the latest XJR 1300 delivers easier handling, higher levels of riding comfort and improved manoeuvrability.
The XJR's 1251 cc four-cylinder air-cooled engine may be old technology - it dates back to the FJ1100 of the early Eighties - but it features a wide range of improvements for 2002 that help boost the low to mid-range torque feel and also make it run cleaner and quieter.
For even more low to mid-range grunt the latest version is equipped with larger carburettors which help increase maximum torque output to a massive 10.7kg-in (104.7Nm) at 6500rpm, making the XJR 1300 one of the gutsiest musclebikes in its class. As well as being more compact than the '01 design, the new BSR37 carburettors are also lighter by substantial 1kg.
Complementing the new carburettors is a redesigned 4-into-1-into-2 exhaust system featuring 42.7mm diameter header pipes. The new system uses multi-stage expansion inversion mufflers with three expansion chambers packed with glass wool, and features larger 25.4mm diameter tail pipes which enhance the XJR1300's low to mid-range torque feel. The clutch has also been beefed up.
To meet EU-i regulations an air induction system is fitted, and this reduces CO and HC emissions by introducing fresh air into the exhaust ports. The latest XJR 1300 engine is also quieter as a result of the use of new camshafts with different profiles, while overall engine appearance is improved with the use of new corrosion-resistant engine sidecovers and a new cylinder head cover.
The chassis has undergone a series of detail changes aimed at improving the overall ride quality and overall weight.
A new-shape fuel tank gives the same 21-Litre capacity, but features a narrower rear section that makes for a much smoother tank/seat joint, and the sides of the seat are also made slimmer for riding comfort, easier manoeuvrability and reduced weight.
The XJR1300's high quality suspension systems feature flex-resistant 43mm forks with revised settings that are aimed at delivering a superior ride quality. At the rear end the dual Ohlins shock absorbers also run with modified settings, and feature larger and softer bump-stop rubbers, as well as modified piggyback reservoir mounting brackets.
Braking feel and performance are improved, and unsprung weight is reduced with a compact new one-piece opposed dual-piston caliper and sintered pads. The new-design YZF-R6-type clutch lever and brake lever are lighter than the previous designs, and feature five-step adjustment.
Unsprung weight at the rear end is reduced by fitting an RI-type ultra-lightweight hollow three-spoke wheel, as well as a lighter swingarm assembly and a new larger-diameter hollow 28mm rear wheel axle shaft.
The XJR1300 SP version is more expensive - but you get a neat paint job and a stepped seat to go with the Ohlins' rear shock.

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:33 am

Yamaha XT600E

You may associate Kawasaki with models that seem to stand still for a decade, but the air-cooled Yamaha XT600E trail bike is a stunning survivor from the 20th century.
All the opposition is liquid-cooled. Still the first choice for go-anywhere adventure, this gutsy thumper is aimed at riders modelled on a brick outhouse. Despite its 17in rear wheel, the XT's seat is still 855mm from the road and its dry weight is 156kg. The model's E suffix refers to its electric start, a daring innovation in 1990 and long since a trailie essential. Four valves are opened by a single camshaft.
The 95mm bore and the low-compression piston's rings are specially coated to reduce clearance and mechanical noise. A twin-choke Teiki carburettor ensures quick response with good mileage. Power is a modest 43PS at just over 6000rpm, but top speed remains a respectable 95mph for the 595cc single. There's nothing here to frighten a home mechanic, and the XT's production run speaks volumes for its basic reliability.
You can buy more agile trail bikes with smaller engines that will outperform the 600 Yamaha, but none have its character or reputation. If you're looking at an XT that's done a lot of off-road miles, and many have, check wheel and swing arm bearings carefully as pressure washing often forces detergent and water past seals. Serious trail riders may keep two sets of wheels, fitted with off-road and road tyres. If so, buy the second pair as part of your deal.

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:35 am

Yamaha XV535 Virago

Want to be one of the cruiser crowd without forking out a fortune? Does cheap insurance and low maintenance bills ring your bell? Are you desperate to get your leg over even if you're only 5ft 1in tall?
Check out Yamaha's shaft drive XV535 Virago. It could be just what you're looking for.
The Virago is one of the neatest factory customs on the highway, with huge finning on the cylinders contributing to the heavyweight cruiser image while still keeping the flab down to an easily manageable 182kg (400lb).
Pullback bars and stacked pipes, bobbed rear mudguard and forks with that Easy Rider rake all add to the image. Chrome spoked wheels will be a pain to keep clean, but polishing your baby is part of the fun of owning a cruiser.
The 535cc V-twin pumps out 44bhp at 7500rpm, not enough to wrench your arms out of their sockets but plenty for 80mph cruising speeds - if you can hang on against the wind. And unlike most cruisers, the Vigaro has a reasonable amount of ground clearance, so you can hustle through corners without dragging footpegs or pipes.
The Vigaro has a well-deserved reputation for reliability in all weathers. With a low centre of gravity and easy handling, Yamaha's middleweight cruiser is a big hit with women riders. But there is a downside. The pillion seat is a tad on the small side, so make sure your passenger has a small bum!

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:36 am

Yamaha XVS1100 Dragstar

The Yamaha cruiser family stretches all the way from 125 to a massive 1700cc with the XVS1100 Drag Star being one of the more affordable big bore V-twins.
A long wheelbase - we're talking 1640mm - accentuates the low cruiser look. With its pull-back handlebars and rigid-look rear end the big Drag Star looks every inch the power cruiser, ready to take on the best from Milwaukee - and at a fraction of the cost.
The Drag Star look comes with footboards and deeply valanced mudguards. Those twin discs up front are well able to haul down the bike from silly cruising speeds even though the Yam tips the scales at 260kg. And if you think that sounds a lot, check out Harley's Softail Standard - that weighs in at 292kg while the Fat Boy needs to go on a diet to shed some of its 307kg.
The Drag Star's air-cooled engine dates back to the Vigaro, so it has been around the block a few times. But at least you know it is going to be reliable.
Maximum torque comes in at 2500rpm, which is just a tad past tick-over for most bikes. Power output peaks at 5700rpm with 62 ponies.
The double cradle frame features a rigid-style rear end to give a clean-looking back section. Similar to the system so successfully debuted on the Royal Star, this innovative rigid-style rear end accentuates the Drag Star's cruiser image, yet at the same time offers a smooth, comfortable ride and makes for easy adjustment.
Shaft drive means this is a bike that should spend most of its time on the road, not in the workshop. But you'll be stopping at petrol stations more often than you really want to because the gas tank only holds 17 litres.

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:37 am

Yamaha XVS650 Dragstar

The Yamaha family of cruisers stretches all the way from 125 to a massive 1600cc. And one of the nicest of the bunch is the XVS650 Drag Star. The air-cooled V-twin engine pushes out maximum torque at 3000 rpm, making this reliable shaft drive cruiser a real pleasure to ride over short or long distances.
What differentiates the Star models from the Virago range is their long, low chassis which emphasise the cruiser looks, and at 1610mm the middleweight Drag Star runs with one of the longest wheelbases in the class.
The double cradle frame features a rigid-style rear end to give the XVS650 a clean-looking back section. Hidden beneath the rider's seat is a preload adjustable monoshock suspension system that can be easily set up to suit solo or two-up riding simply by removing the seat.
Similar to the system so successfully debuted on the Royal Star, this innovative rigid-style rear end accentuates the Drag Star's cruiser image, yet at the same time offers a smooth, comfortable ride and makes for easy adjustment.
More cruiser influence can be seen at the front end with the heavy duty raked front forks. Sturdy 41mm diameter tubes resist flex for smooth suspension action, and distance between the tubes is taken out to a massive 240mm. With a caster angle of 35 degrees and trail of 153mm, the Drag Star's front end delivers relaxed steering backed up by excellent straight line stability, making this middleweight ideally suited to serious long distance cruising.
In keeping with its cruiser looks the Drag Star is equipped with a classic teardrop tank, which carries a chrome plated speedometer assembly. Holding a generous 16 litres, the tank gives the Drag Star a decent range, underlining its long distance capability.
Running with a 160/90 front tyre and massive 170/80 rear, the chrome-plated wheels are laced with special anti-corrosive spokes and nipples that feature a resin coating, which helps them, retain their showroom appearance. This "Cosmer" coating process is also used on other bolts, brackets and muffler components, which together with the abundance of heavy-duty chrome plating gives the machine an extremely high quality finish.
Power output may be a measly 39.5bhp, but this is a cruiser, not a muscle bike. Chill out and enjoy the ride.

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:38 am

Yamaha YZF1000R Thunderace

Yamaha's YZF1000R is one of today's best supersports bikes, but it is up against some tough competition. The FireBlade has a huge following, and the Ace has never come close to stealing the Honda's thunder. The YZF1000R even plays second fiddle in the performance stakes to Yamaha's own R1.
So why would anyone want a Thunderace? It's all about horses for courses. If you want one of the most focussed 1000cc supersports, then the YZF-R1 is for you. But the R1 is too extreme for most riders who have to get to work on a wet and windy Monday morning after their trackday thrash. If you want a bike that's a brilliant all-rounder the Ace is a better buy.
Heart of the Thunderace is Yamaha's legendary 1002cc 20-valve forward-slanting liquid-cooled four-cylinder motor. It is equipped with downdraught carburettors, throttle position sensor, gear position sensor, and a torque-boosting EXUP system for massive low- to mid-range performance.
With a claimed 143bhp at 10,000rpm there's plenty of grunt available for easy roll-on overtaking. Keep the engine spinning above 7000 and this bike really motors. Top speed is a touch over 160mph.
Like its little brother the Thundercat, the Ace has a 'an aerodynamically-efficient fairing and low stress ergonomically-developed riding position'. Which means the Ace is a lot more comfortable to ride if you want to cover long distances quickly. The Thunderace handles pretty good too, thanks to the super-stiff alloy Deltabox chassis.
The 298mm front discs and lightweight four-pot calipers are some of the best available on a street bike, and are the same as used on the 175mph R1 - in fact, the Thunderace was running them two years before the R1 was launched. The superbly engineered one-piece front brake calipers deliver enormous stopping power combined with bags of feel.
Think more sports-tourer than supersports. Fast, comfortable and with sure handling, the Thunderace is a great all-rounder. And if your pillion passenger has any say on the matter, the R1 or Blade won't get a look-in.

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:40 am

Yamaha YZF600 Thundercat

Yamaha's YZF600R is one of today's best middleweights, but it is up against some tough competition. Honda's CBR600 has a huge following, and Kawasaki's ZX-6R is another top performer. The Thundercat even plays second fiddle in the performance stakes to Yam's own R6.
So why would anyone want to own a Thundercat? It's all about horses for courses. If you want one of the most focussed middleweight supersports, then the YZF-R6 is for you. But the R6 is too extreme for most riders who have to get to work on a wet and windy Monday morning after their trackday thrash. If you want a bike that's a brilliant all-rounder the Thundercat is a better buy.
Yamaha say that with over 92bhp on offer, the forward-slanting liquid-cooled four-cylinder motor is the most powerful and flexible 600 they've ever built for the street. The 24-valve engine (the same unit as fitted to the latest FZS600 Fazer) pumps out plenty of mid-range thrust for easy roll-on overtaking and delivers even quicker acceleration than the R6. Keep the engine spinning above 9000 and this Cat moves like a scalded pussy. Top speed is a touch over 160mph.
Yamaha say the Cat has a 'specially-developed low-fatigue riding position and super-slippery aerodynamic bodywork'. Which means the Cat is a lot more comfortable to ride if you want to cover long distances quickly. The Thundercat handles pretty good too, thanks to the super-stiff steel Deltabox chassis.
The brakes are some of the best available on a street bike, and come straight from the 175mph R1 after a short spell on the Superbike factory racers. Superbly engineered one-piece front brake calipers deliver enormous stopping power combined with bags of feel.
Some riders complain that the rear shock spring is too soft, but aftermarket replacements can be fitted for less than 80.
The Thundercat is a great all-rounder. And if your pillion passenger has any say in the matter, this is going to be your next 600.

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:41 am

Yamaha YZF-R1 1000

Delivering 172 horsepower and weighing 172 kilograms, the 2004 Yamaha R1 is the first machine in its class to achieve the 1:1 power to weight ratio - a statistic that guarantees this awesome motorcycle an automatic entry in the record books.
The original R1 has gone down in motorcycle folklore as the bike that turned the supersport class upside down. The magical numbers associated with the original R1 were 150bhp and 177kg. But the figures only told a part of the story, for the original R1 opened up a new world of performance that astonished those who unleashed its awesome potential.
Featuring the most advanced and sophisticated engine and chassis technology ever employed on a Yamaha production machine, the all-new R1 represents as great a leap forward now as the original bike did seven years ago.
The seemingly unattainable goal of one horsepower per kilogram was considered almost impossible just a few years ago, and to put it in perspective a typical two-seater sports car would need to be producing over 1000bhp to match the new R1?s power to weight ratio.
But that 172bhp @ 12,500rpm is only the beginning - when the effects of forced air intake are taken into account, the maximum power output of the new R1 engine rises to 180 horsepower, easily smashing the 1:1 barrier!
The new cylinder layout is angled forwards at 40 degrees. This configuration is similar to the layout used on Yamaha's MotoGP racing machinery, and it allows greater freedom in the development of a much stiffer chassis. By sloping the engine forwards, the new generation R1 frame has a virtually straight, unimpeded run from the headstock through to the swingarm pivot point, which, in chassis terms, is an idealised layout.
And because the cylinder head now sits below the route of the twin spars, the overall width between the spars is greatly reduced. This in turn allows the fitment of a slimmer fuel tank, which makes for a more comfortable and aerodynamic riding position.
The latest R1 uses a totally new fuel injection system featuring twin valve throttle bodies, and digitally controlled motor-driven secondary butterfly valves that actively control the airflow. The result is class-leading driveability together with precision throttle response that makes for previously unattainable levels of controllability.
One of the most significant stylistic changes seen on the new R1 is the compact new 4-into-1-into-2 exhaust. Tucked beneath the seat, the dual titanium end cans give the R1 a slim and aggressive looking rear end and the system has been tuned to emit a deep, strong growl that gives more than a hint that this is the most powerful Yamaha supersport ever.
The torque-boosting EXUP (Exhaust Ultimate Powervalve) system is situated where the four header pipes flow into one, and features a titanium butterfly valve for the first time.
The latest race-bred technology is virtually wherever you look on the new R1, and the radially mounted front brake calipers are another example of how MotoGP influences the 2004 model. Mounted to highly rigid cast brackets on the 43mm front forks, the R1's dual one-piece four piston calipers grip the 320mm diameter front discs to give outstanding braking performance.
For improved control the calipers are operated by a new radial pump type Brembo master cylinder assembly which ensures that the new front braking system delivers the accurate feel that R1 riders need to get the best from their machinery.
The third generation R1 runs with new five-spoke wheels with a 120/70 ZR17 front tyre and 190/50 ZR17 rear. Featuring slim, hollow cast spokes, the 3.50 wide front wheel and 6.00 wide rear are lighter than the previous three-spoke design, and the reduction in unsprung weight makes a positive contribution to front and rear suspension performance.
And if that isn't enough, Yamaha are offering a range of goodies for the R1 including double-bubble screen, crash bungs, carbon front mudguard, and a single seat cover. You know you want one.

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Re: Yamaha

Post by Admin on Fri Jul 18, 2008 12:42 am

Yamaha YZF-R6 600

Yamaha's engineers started with a blank sheet of paper when they designed the original R6. Launched way back in 1998, it featured a compact aluminium chassis and the first production four-stroke engine capable of more than 200hp/litre (it delivered 120hp at 13,000rpm).
Wheelbase was just 1380mm and dry weight a slim 169kg. It was the bike to have in the 600 class - until 2001, when the R6 was updated with lighter pistons and modified con rods for better midrange response. The weight was reduced another 1.5kg, and the rear tail section now carried LED lights. No big deal there, then. But when Suzuki unveiled the new GSX-R600, Yamaha had to come up with something special.
The 2003 R6 is even sharper, but it's far more rider-friendly. Using a special casting process for the swingarm (10mm longer than the old one) and parts of the frame means the wall thickness can be dramatically reduced, saving weight.
Formed by mould casting in a two-piece construction, the 2003 frame is 500g lighter and 50% more rigid in lateral torsion compared to the 2002 bike. Torsional stiffness is equivalent to the Superbike racer YZF-R7's frame. The old bike needed 16 welds to fabricate it, the new frame needs only two!
Big improvement for '03 is that the R6 has the same suction-piston type fuel injection that earned an excellent reputation on the 2002 YZF-R1. The air box is also bigger.
Yamaha claim the engine has 90% newly designed parts, including cylinder bores with a ceramic-composite compound on the walls for better heat dispersal. The gearbox is also slicker.
Hiroshi Takimoto, engineer and project leader adds: "We have developed a model with enough of a difference in the engine and chassis that people moving up to it from the existing YZF-R6 will feel clearly how much it has improved. The new YZF-R6 is not just a brighter spec version of the old. It is a machine with new technology, new ride and new design that people."
Fast, light and nimble, the new R6 is a bike that deserves to be thrashed. Enjoy.

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Re: Yamaha

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